Trees

you’ve got the power

heart-4A few years ago, a patient came in with some unexplained symptoms. She’d been to the hospital twice, and even had a small surgery that didn’t help the problem. Bad as that was, she’d also gotten some bad news on a related genetic test. You can imagine she was pretty scared.

 

I told her: “Epigenetics is your friend.

 

Translated: Your genes are not your destiny. Your choices can protect against, prevent or override the genetic cards in your hand.

 

With that in mind, I was gratified to read a New York Times story confirming the power of lifestyle choice on health outcomes — even with uncongenial genes. (more…)

the third level of healthcare

You’ve been to your primary-care doctor. You’ve been to a specialist. Maybe you’ve even been to multiple specialists.

 

And they’ve given you bad news, or confusing news, or they say there’s nothing wrong when clearly something is.

 

That’s where the third level of care comes in. And that’s my specialty.

 

 

If you’ve got health issues and aren’t sure where to go, consider naturopathic medicine. You can even book your appointment online. We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

Learn more about naturopathic medicine here.

 

 

 

the three keys to optimal health

At its root, health really isn’t that complicated. Getting and staying health comes down to three simple things — assimilation, elimination and managing inflammation. In this short(ish) video, Dr. Izakson breaks it down and gives you the key to the natural-health kingdom.

 

come out and play!

Dr. Izakson has some speaking gigs coming up, and she’d love to meet you.

 

First up, Dr. Izakson is talking about vital living at the Inspiring Woman Leaders Fifth Annual Women’s Leadership Conference on March 5 at the McMenamin’s Kennedy School. The event is even near the office, for those of you who love the Alberta/Concordia neighborhood.

 

One week later, check out the Women in Balance Institute’s Women’s Health Day. Dr. Izakson will be talking about detoxification — with a twist.

 

Both promise to be fun events. We look forward to seeing you there!

 

Oxbow-Oregon-Lifestyle-Head-Shot-WEB-084A5559

 

 

how you eat will change your life. period.

This TEDx video has been making the rounds in emails and social media. A lot of these things get tossed your way. And you may have been leery about wasting 17 minutes of your busy time on yet another random video.

 

That’s certainly how I felt. But after seeing glowing recommendations from so many medical colleagues and friends, I got curious. And now I’m recommending — in the strongest terms — that you watch it, too.

 

Real food will change your life.

Seriously.

 

The story here is of an active woman, a medical doctor, who was crippled with Multiple Sclerosis. In MS, a person’s immune system starts attacking the sheathing that protects the nerves. That sheathing (remember the word “myelin” from high school bio?) is like the plastic encasing electrical wires, and does the exact same thing: helps electricity travel through the nerves and prevents shocks in the wrong places. MS is considered an incurable, degenerative disease.

 

The speaker, Dr. Terry Wahls, wasn’t willing to accept that prognosis. Because she’s an MD, she made sure she tried all the drugs, including the experimental ones. When that didn’t work, she started doing her own research. The video outlines her findings, but my patients and followers won’t be surprised — it’s basically the same diet I recommend for nearly everyone.

 

I really want you to watch the video so I’m not going to tell you how dramatically well this worked for Dr. Wahls. But the bottom line for you is this: How you eat changes your life.

 

So watch. Learn. Apply to your own life. You can feel awesome, whether or not you have an autoimmune, degenerative, incurable disease. And if all the competing  food choices have you (justifiably!) confused, give us a call. That’s what we’re here for.

 

 

 

Like videos? We’ve started a YouTube channel of our favorites. Watch for updates!

 

when foods sit around and ‘go good’

Dr. O’s note: This awesome post was written by my friend Marina P-K, who lives in a Permaculture paradise of her creation in the northern Sierra Nevadas. She works with beings of several kingdoms — plants, animals and microbes — and shares her copious knowledge freely. Reprinted with permission from her blog, Cultured, Aged, Brewed, (“A docu-sploration of what happens when we allow foods to sit around long enough to ‘go good.'”) this article considers serious infections, building and supporting a strong immune system, and giving the body appropriate microflora through the use of traditional fermented foods. 

 

Warning, graphic pictures in today’s post. I think they’re amazing documentation of the body’s ability to heal, but if your stomach is easily turned I suggest scrolling down til the subject turns to garlic.

 

Today marks the fourth week in healing the holes my pig poked and tore in my legs. The puncture in my shin is growing smaller and remains predictable, but the cut on my thigh has become infected. I host a certain strain of staph bacteria. A neglected cut at age six resulted in a  swollen foot and a course of antibiotics. The doctor explained to my mother that once staph enters our blood stream, it never really goes away. My immune system can surpress and restrain it, but when a large enough disturbance tests my biological defense systems, staph emerges.  (more…)

Arthritic moose redefine human disease

Filed under: food as medicine,Uncategorized — Tags: , , — Orna @ 6:23 am

What can humans learn from moose? A lot about osteoarthrtitis, as it turns out. Moose and humans develop the degenerative joint disease in much the same ways and with most of the same symptoms. Osteoarthritis is generally considered a disease caused by the wear and tear of joints over the course of a long life. But a 50-year study of OA in the moose of Isle Royale in Lake Superior turned up an interesting nugget with implications for both species: Development of the disease correlates with malnutrition, especially in early life. Over the course of the study, researchers began seeing trends in the disease’s expression. As populations grew, and resources to support them shrank proportionately, more moose developed osteoarthritis. When there were fewer moose, presumably better fed, the disease’s prevalence abated. Ancient human remains from the onset of agriculture have shown similar arthritic changes. Scientists initially attributed this to the extra work of maintaining fields, but the moose findings suggest malnutrition during the switch to new food sources may have been the true cause. (Via ScienceDaily.)

beets beat high blood pressure

Filed under: food as medicine,high blood pressure,Uncategorized — Tags: , , — Orna @ 6:59 am

Looking for ways to beat high blood pressure with few or no drugs? The latest findings show beets can help. The juice of the blood-red root crop is high in nitrates; these convert in the body to nitric acid, which relaxes blood vessels to lower blood pressure. Many people with hypertension currently take a prescription form of nitrates, but researchers found a pint of beet juice may work just as well. Researchers noted effects in people with normal and high blood pressure, and the results were more profound among those with higher initial readings. Bottoms up! (Via BBC.)

why grandpa really loved rye bread

Finnish researchers have uncovered grandpa’s secret: Turns out that rye bread is nature’s great answer to constipation. Writing in the Journal of Nutrition, the researcher found rye is not only more effective than laxative medications, it also helps make the gut healthier. Rye is rich in a compound called arabinoxylan, a favorite food of healthy bacteria in the colon. The bacteria ferment the compound to create short-chain fatty acids, which make the colon more acid, less friendly to pathogens and more active in moving wastes out. Constipation affects an estimated 27 percent of people in Western countries. Turns out grandpa had it right after all.

brain food

Photo by Oktaviani Marvikasari.

Photo by Oktaviani Marvikasari.

You’ve always heard that fish is brain food. Now, a growing body of research is supporting that contention.

 

One study published in the February edition of the Archives of General Psychiatry found that fish-oil supplements high in omega-3 fatty acids warded off psychosis in high-risk teens. Study participants received either fish oil or a placebo for 12 weeks. One year later, more of the fish-oil teens were still psychosis free. Researchers say the results are as good as those seen with antipsychotic medications, with benefits lasting longer than any other intervention. And, unlike typical pharmaceutical prescriptions that cause problems including weight gain and libido loss, fish oils seem to have no major negative side effects.

 

Other studies are finding that omega-3 oils can help the mind stay young and sharp. Earlier reports found that DHA, one specific form of omega-3, helped slow dementia but didn’t help folks with Alzheimer’s disease. A February report in the Journal of Neurochemistry suggests that EPA, another omega-3, may do the trick. The report’s authors believe EPA helps slow the natural decline of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter, helping keep the brain young and boost memory and learning. Both DHA and EPA are typically found in fish-oil supplements in varying ratios.

 

A version of this post originally appeared on Wellwire.com.

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